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Your Response Counts!

21 October 2006 by Sue Samson

The Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library at The University of Montana will be surveying users about overall satisfaction with library services and collections during October.

UM students, faculty members and staff will be randomly selected to receive the Web survey, LibQual+. Survey participants will be eligible to win one of four $50 gift certificates to The Bookstore at UM.

Based on consumer surveys used in business, LibQual+ grew from a research and development project of the Association of Research Libraries to a standard tool used to define and measure library service quality across institutions. Survey participants are asked to measure the library services relative to their expectations. An opportunity for open comment also is provided. Libraries use information from the survey to initiate a variety of corrective actions to provide services that are more closely aligned with user expectations.

More than 300 academic libraries across the nation will participate in the survey this year. Results also will allow comparisons of service quality among peer institutions to develop benchmarks and understanding of best practices. The ultimate goal is improve services to help library users reach their learning and research objectives.

The Mansfield Library will be surveying users about overall satisfaction with library services and collections during October.

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4 Responses to “Your Response Counts!”

  1. Peter Tolton Says:

    I have one major complaint about this library, and I hope that this is an appropriate and effective method of conveying it. It is ridiculous that we, as students, are restricted from the right-click function on the public computers. This is silly for a number of reasons:
    1. There are many constructive uses for the right-click function.
    2. It allows for quicker and more expedient computer usage, which I believe that considering the high demand for PC use (especially between 11AM and 3PM), is important to all
    3. Many (if not all) of the right click functions are accessible via other commands, ones that are less handy. The problem here is that those who know how to get around it are the ones that would use the function maliciously, which makes the restriction a moot point given that only those who are less adept at computer use are restricted from right-click functions.
    4. The right-click is a necessary component in both Internet navigation and word processing, which are the two most highly used services provided by the library Dells.

    Thank you so much for your consideration. Even if the reasons listed here are considered invalid, some feedback at peter.tolton@umontana.edu would be greatly appreciated.

    -Pete

  2. Sue Samson Says:

    These are good suggestions, and we will review our options within the framework of the policies in which we operate. Thanks for your comments!

  3. Jamie Says:

    I agree, it is annoying to not be able to right click at times. Are security protocols like this ever a necessity? At least enable a few functions commonly available on the right click; e.g. copy and paste. Often, the keyboard shortcuts (CTRL+C) will work despite right click disabling. Security is important; however, intuitive applications of security protocols is essential for happy users.

  4. Sue Samson Says:

    Thanks for the in put. In response to user requests, we have implemented the right click function inside of applications. Thus, if you are working in MS Word or in a Web page, you can use the right click function. It is only disabled as a function on the desktop for security reasons. Please let us know if this is not working correctly for you.

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