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What’s Your Favorite Banned Book?

23 September 2013 by Julie Biando Edwards

This week is Banned Books Week, and initiative of the American Library Association bringing attention to issues of censorship and the freedom to read. All week we’ll be highlighting information about BBW and featuring videos of members of the UM community talking about their favorite banned books. Today’s blog features Mansfield Library employees sharing some of their favorite banned books. What are some of your favorites?

Shelley Ramberg: Assistant ILS Administrator
Howl – Allen Ginsberg
Blankets – Craig Thompson
Thirteen reasons why – Jay Asher
The glass castle – Jeanette Walls

Sarah Weatherby: Reference Technician

As I Lay Dying – William Faulkner
Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
The Giving Tree – Shel Silverstein
The Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
The Harry Potter series – J.K. Rowling
Julie of the Wolves – Jean Craighead George
Leaves of Grass – Walt Whitman
1984 – George Orwell
One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five – Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
The Sun Also Rises – Ernest Hemingway

 

Karen Jaskar: Assistant Professor, Social Sciences Librarian
Truth and Beauty – Ann Patchett
Olive’s Ocean – Kevin Henkes
Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
Ceremony – Leslie Marmon Silko
The Botany of Desire – Michael Pollan

 

Audra Loyal: Adjunct Librarian
Flowers for AlgernonDaniel Keyes
Sex – Madonna
Lord of the Flies -William Golding
The Handmaid’s Tale – by Margaret Atwood

 

Pat Turnage: Media Acquisitions
Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
Slaughterhouse-Five – Kurt Vonnegut

 

Julie Biando Edwards: Associate Professor, Ethnic Studies Librarian & Diversity Coordinator
Charlotte’s Web
– E.B. White
Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
The Giving Tree – Shel Silverstein
1984 – George Orwell
Lord of the Flies -William Golding
Flowers for AlgernonDaniel Keyes
Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do you See? – Bill  Martin, Jr.

 

Jordan Hess: Web Developer
Flowers for AlgernonDaniel Keyes
Ulysses – James Joyce
As I Lay Dying – William Faulkner
The Catcher in the Rye – J.D. Salinger
Cat’s CradleKurt Vonnegut

 

 

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UM Professor and Missoula Public Library Present “Muslim Journeys”

19 September 2013 by Julie Biando Edwards

UM Professor Samir Bitar is helping lead a reading and discussion group at the Missoula Public Library on the topic of Muslim Journeys. Sponsored by Humanities Montana, in partnership with Missoula Public Library and Dillon Public Library, this scholar-led reading and discussion program is based on the Muslim Journeys bookshelf—a program jointly produced by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association Public Programs Office to promote understanding of and mutual respect for people with diverse histories, cultures, and perspectives. Copies of each title will be available while supplies last for check-out at the Accounts Desk one month prior to each discussion. For more information or to participate in discussions please see the Missoula Public Library Website at: http://www.missoulapubliclibrary.org/index.php/adult-events/406-muslim-journeys.

 

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New Issue of Connections

18 September 2013 by Jordan Hess

The new issue of Connections, a biannual newsletter published by the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library, is now available on-line. The library has made great strides in supporting UM students and faculty through new initiatives and programs that are aligned with the UM 2020 Strategic Goals.

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Meet the Mansfield – Kate Zoellner

17 September 2013 by sarah.weatherby

What is your name and work title?

Kate Zoellner, Associate Professor, Education, Human Sciences and Psychology Librarian, Assessment Coordinator

What do you do in the library?

I teach and develop online materials about research processes and resources (e.g., conducting a literature review, searching specialized databases) to further the research/teaching/learning of UM students/faculty/staff, particularly for members of the College of Education and Human Sciences and the Psychology Department. I purchase materials in those subject areas for the library collection, too. I also work at the library’s Reference Desk, organize research workshops, and coordinate the library’s high school outreach. In terms of assessment I chair the library’s Assessment Committee which works to imbed and foster data-informed decision-making to improve library services, implement and analyze surveys (e.g., LibQUAL), and develop reports for accreditation and other purposes. I serve on other library and university committees. And I conduct research on assessment in libraries and on faculty and graduate student work and information seeking practices.

I’m currently working on a project to highlight graduate students’ research and library expertise and experiences. (If you are a graduate student reading this and would like to contribute and be recognized I’d be thrilled to talk with you – do contact me!)

What are you watching/reading/listening to right now?

I’m reading (and admiring the stunning prints in) Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent edited by Ian Berry and Michael Dunn. And I’m listening to the 20th anniversary edition of Los Lobos’ album Kiko.

 

 

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Meet the Mansfield – Nicole Dobrowlski

10 September 2013 by sarah.weatherby

Name and work title:

Nicole Dobrowolski, Conservation/Preservation Technician

What do you do in the library?

I repair books, pamphlets, maps, and other paper-based items so that they can continue to be used by patrons. When an item is damaged due to regular wear and tear, negligence, intentional vandalism, or even previous attempts at repair using non-archival techniques such as tape (never use tape), it comes to the Preservation Department and we attempt to restore it to a usable format while conserving as much of the original item as possible. I’m currently working on a [Re]Housing project for Archives & Special Collections wherein items from the Montana collection are removed from old acidic binders, repaired if possible, and put into more appropriate enclosures.

What are you watching/reading/listening to right now?

I recently re-watched the original Star Wars trilogy (on VHS, no less). I just finished reading The Word for World is Forest by Ursula K. LeGuin and I’m now starting a re-read of Sabriel by Garth Nix. I am always listening to music: the theme from Reading Rainbow is running through my head right now.

 

 

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Veteran Orientation & Tour

6 September 2013 by Sue Samson

Veterans, please meet in the Library Lobby Wednesday, September 11, noon-1:00pm for a library orientation and tour tailored to your individual questions.

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Meet the Mansfield at Missoula College – Annie Weiler

4 September 2013 by sarah.weatherby

Name and work title:

Annie Weiler, Library Technician

What do you do in the library?

A little bit of everything, including Reference, Circulation, Copy Center and Reserve.  I also check in all the journals and newspapers.  Recently, I worked with my student to withdraw hundreds of books using cataloging, OCLC. I am a member of the ILS committee.  There are probably a few other things I have forgotten.

What are you watching/reading/listening to right now?

I am re-reading all of the Discworld books in anticipation of #40 coming out in November.  I am always reading 1 or 2 books with my eyes as well as listening to another with my ears.

 

 

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New checkout periods

3 September 2013 by Chris Vance

Beginning this semester, all material types including media and print serials will check out for the same length as books do for each patron type. A few items, laptops, keys, headphones, etc. and Reserve items still have shorter check out times.

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50 years ago today….

28 August 2013 by Susanne Caro

50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

“On August 28, 1963, hundreds of thousands of Americans of all colors, races, and creeds joined in a peaceful demonstration in Washington, D.C. The event reached its dramatic climax at the Lincoln Memorial with music, prayers, remarks, and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legendary “I Have A Dream” speech. This moment was a turning point in American history that set our nation on the path to full equality and justice under the law.”

 

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New Library Website

26 August 2013 by Jordan Hess

The library released a new version of its website last week. This new website is part of ongoing efforts to increase access to library services and to standardize the look, feel, and function of University of Montana websites. The new website will be released in stages—the new look and feel was released last week; additional functionality and performance improvements will be rolled out in the coming weeks.

Our new website also allows us to feature images from our unique collections. Did you know the library has over a quarter million images and pages in its digital collections? We’re going to be featuring unique items from those collections to pique your interests while you research. If historic images aren’t your flavor, you’ll also find featured images from library events, lectures, and classes.

We believe the new website will help us serve you better. In the coming weeks, look for an interactive event calendar, an improved library blog, library-related informational and how-to videos, and improved accessibility of content and library-related resources.

As always, please feel free to make suggestions. Our web design process is increasingly iterative—we will be rolling out new features throughout the semester as they’re ready. It’s possible that your suggestion could be our next big improvement.

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